Thursday, January 19, 2017

Systematic Instructional Design

This set of Readings, Watchings, Listenings, and Doings (RWLDs) will prepare you for the lecture on "Systematic Instructional Design" and also help you plan an interdisciplinary thematic unit of instruction.  




Identifying Your Destination
The Teaching/Learning situation is not limited to identifying a "coooool" activity and then connecting forms of instruction and assessment to it. To effectively design and develop learning activities, it is necessary to identify the desired outcome first.  This provides direction for your instructional activities.

Your desired outcomes for Iowa classroom activities are determined by the Iowa Core Curriculum (or other relevant standards that you will find on the Assignment page.) The subject-specific standards are organized by Essential Concepts/Goals. Each of these Essential Concepts/Goals is supported by Skills/Objectives that will provide observable  behaviors that can be measured to indicate a student's mastery.

You, the teacher, want to do a thematic unit on Plant Life.  You want to do some experiments with plants (Science), Capture the data with graphs (Math) and create a report on your findings (Literacy).  

This video demonstrates the process you would follow accessing the Iowa Core:


In the Thematic Unit, Plant Life, you have addressed 3 topics and their Standards/Essential Concepts/Skills.  Here is a table of what was addressed in the video:


You have identified what your students will be learning and now you must design and create a set of lesson activities that will help your students master this skill.

It's just common sense to begin with the end in mind, but this is called Backward Design. If you don't know where you are going, how will you know how to get there?

Here is a video that uses the metaphor of planning a trip to describe Backward Design.



Makes a lot of sense, doesn't it?  If you don't know where you will be going, you won't be able to figure out how to get there.

Backward Design is the basis for an instructional design system called Understanding by Design.

The Understanding by Design framework has 3 parts:
  1. Identify Desired Results
    1. What will students know?
    2. What will students be able to do?
  2. Determine Acceptable Evidence
    1. What performance will meaning-making and transfer
  3. Create the Learning Plans
    1. Learning Plan (instruction)
    2. Learning Activities (experiences)
Bernajean Porter does a good job of explaining the aspects of Understanding by Design. The most significant point that she makes is that starting with the "End in Mind" is just common sense.



Understanding by Design
is a framework which provides direction for unit lesson planning. It begins by identifying the Desired Outcomes and Results and then makes a plan to achieve that outcome.

Technology Standards for Students
Subject standards are necessary for knowing WHAT to teach in subject areas and Technology standards can provide guidance for HOW to support learning in these areas using technology. The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) has developed Standards for Students that organize the necessary skills personal roles. A collection of four skill descriptions (with active verbs) have been identified as necessary for each role.

Download these ISTE Standards for Students.  These seven roles include:
  1. Empowered Learner.
  2. Digital Citizen
  3. Knowledge Constructor
  4. Innovative Designer
  5. Computational Thinker
  6. Creative Communicator
  7. Global Collaborator
Putting It All Together with TPACK
Teaching and Learning through technology is much more than just using Powerpoint and Twitter. It is an integration Technology, Pedagogy (Teaching Strategies), and Content Knowledge.  The venn diagram below shows how each of these areas can combine and impact the others.  Certain forms of Technology can be used to support specific teaching strategies (Pedagogy).  That is TPK intersection.  Specific forms of pedagogy are used to teach specific forms of Content Knowledge.  Ultimately the TPACK educator is interested in teaching in the "sweet spot" in the middle where all three areas are fully integrated.
    Reproduced by permission of the publisher, © 2012 by tpack.org
Read more about the TPACK model (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge) which we consider a framework that identifies the knowledge teachers need to teach effectively with technology.  
You can also watch this video which provides a brief introduction to TPACK in 2 minutes. 


 
Prepare for Your Thematic Unit
Find the Thematic Unit Description project requirements in eLearning under Labs (Class Projects). Familiarize yourself with the expectations and resources provided for your first big project in the course.